Your Career Is Your Business–Here Are Some Personal Marketing Tips to Help You Succeed

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Published November 02, 2018 on Inc. Magazine by Peter Economy

According to career expert Ines Temple, you’ll find success when you manage your career like a business with you as its most valuable asset.

We all want to have great careers — working for companies that matter, progressing up the ladder of success, and maybe even changing the world…or at least some small part of it. However, some of us seem to have better, more fulfilling careers than others. Why is this the case?

Says career expert Ines Temple, president of Lee Hecht Harrison in Peru and Chile (with whom I’ve done work in the past), and author of the book You Incorporated, “We can get closer to achieving the rewards of an ideal job if we build and strengthen our career potential and work on our competitiveness in order to become more attractive to companies and employers.”

In other words, the more attractive you are to employers, the better career you can create for yourself. The secret is to treat your career as a business, creating a competitive and attractive brand that employers (not just your own) want. This makes you more employable.

In her book, Ines lays out 7 personal marketing tips to consider as you build your personal brand:

1. All jobs are temporary and last as long as it works for both parties — the company and us.

2. We have to find satisfaction in our current position and not what lies down the road, such as a promotion or raise.

4. We have to take care of our attitude toward both internal and external clients and remember that our main client is our boss.

5. Our peers, collaborators, supervisors, and those we supervise are also internal clients, and together with external clients, are good contacts and relationships.

6. To be more employable, we must do more than what is asked of us, which means adding our own contributions, improving each day, and not improvising.

7. Our attitude is vital for success. The passion we put into our work determines our employability level.

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